The Girl on the Train

This book review was originally published on The Wordy Nerd Books on April 28, 2015.

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins has been on several bestsellers lists for quite a while.  I’ve seen other avid readers raving about it and comparing it to Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl.  I finally decided that I needed to jump on the bandwagon and pick this book up.

The Girl On The Train
The Girl On The Train

I ordered this book from Amazon and I was so excited when it arrived at my front door.  I dug into it pretty quickly and I have to say, it did not disappoint.  This book was fast-paced and hooked me fast.  The story starts by introducing Rachel, a young woman whose world has fallen apart.  She is divorced and was recently let go from her job.  She spends her days drinking and riding commuter trains into the city so her roommate won’t know she no longer has a job.  She spends so much time on the train that she begins to make up lives for the people that she passes each day.  And then one day she witnesses something that might help the police in a missing person case but with Rachel’s history concerning alcohol, the police aren’t sure they can trust her.

I can absolutely see how this book has been compared to Gone Girl.  While I see the similarities, I don’t think the plot twists were quite as stunning to the reader as it was in Gone Girl.  The Girl on the Train definitely has surprising twists and turns.  I just think the reader can predict some of them. However, I don’t think that it took away from the book.  I still enjoyed it and I didn’t figure everything out so there were still some surprises.

The writing was good but I didn’t find that anything special about it stuck out for me.  Hawkins did a good job helping the reader jump to conclusions about different characters.  She develops the characters well. Overall, it’s easy to read and Hawkins does a good job at keeping the reader engaged.

If you’re into murder, mystery, and crimes, or if you like books similar to Gone Girl, then pick up The Girl on the Train.  It’s a great read.  Overall, I rated it four out of five stars!

4 Star Rating

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission (at no cost to you).

Station Eleven

This review was originally published on The Wordy Nerd Books on March 14, 2015.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel follows a group of actors and musicians in a post-apocalyptic world who are trying to preserve the arts.  It all begins when a highly contagious, airborne virus sweeps across the world.  In a

Station Elevenmatter of weeks the majority of the world’s population has been eradicated.  The survivors are slowly making a new life for themselves but when the caravan of actors and musicians arrive in a town called St. Deborah by the Water, they meet a violent prophet who digs graves for anyone who tries to leave the town.

I picked this book up for a few different reasons.  The first being that it was a National Book Award finalist.  The second being that it came highly recommended by several of my reader friends.   Reading this book was definitely a good call. My favorite thing about this book is its unique take on a post apocalyptic world.  It seems like most of the books in that genre that I have read in the past few years involve a strong, controlling government or authority or some kind of zombies or creatures to fear.  Station Eleven didn’t have those elements.  The characters live in a world that many of us can’t imagine but the most dangerous element of that world is the other people in it.  To put it simply, the world in Station Eleven seems like a much more realistic and plausible take on how the world could end up if something catastrophic occurs.

Station Eleven alternates between the past and the present as well as between the different characters’ point of view.  Mandel did a wonderful job at pulling this off.  It allows her to tell the story of how the virus spread and impacted the world while also letting us see how the people who survived ended up where they are. It was easy to follow and the different takes on the story line complimented each other well.  It was also a book that really pulled me in.  It held my interest and I read it rather quickly.

I enjoyed this book and Mandel’s writing so much that I rated this book a solid five stars.  If you enjoy post-apocalyptic stories but would like something a bit different from the typical book in this genre, check out Station Eleven.

5 Star Rating

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission (at no cost to you).

This Is Where I Leave You

This Is Where I Leave You
This Is Where I Leave You

This book review was originally published on The Wordy Nerd Books on November 20, 2014.

Judd Foxman’s wife is sleeping with his boss and his dad just died.  Judd, stressed and beaten down, returns to his childhood home to mourn his father with his two brothers, his sister, and mother.  The siblings are shocked to find out that their non-religious father’s dying request was that they would sit shiva as a family.  The Foxman siblings are less than thrilled to sit in mourning for seven days as a family but oblige for their mother’s sake.  Jonathan Tropper brings to life the dysfunctional Foxman family as they navigate awkward family dynamics and rehash the past with each other in The is Where I Leave You.

I really just want to gush about this book.  I absolutely loved it.  I was able to relate to each character and I really appreciated each of the different, personal issues that the characters were dealing with.  The book was well-written and I had a really hard time putting it down.  Tropper did an amazing job of instilling humor into some really tough situations in the book.  Even though the topics were not the most positive, Tropper kept me laughing throughout the book.

I highly recommend this book if you are looking for a good laugh and a family to fall in love with.  This book was also made into a movie this year.  I have not seen it yet but, after finishing the book, I can’t wait for the movie to come out on DVD.  I rated this book four stars.  I gave it four stars instead of five because, quite frankly, I just wanted more of the Foxman family.  Finishing this book made me a little bit sad. You can grab a copy here!

4 Star Rating

 

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission (at no cost to you).

Sharp Objects

Sharp ObjectsThis book review was originally published on The Wordy Nerd Books on October 27, 2014.

Gillian Flynn is known for writing the hit novel Gone Girl but she actually has several other books that are just as dark and enthralling.  Sharp Objects is one of those novels.  This novel follows reporter Camille Preaker as she travels back to her hometown to cover the gruesome murder of two young girls for the newspaper for which she works. It has been years since Camille has visited her childhood home and it is an understatement to say that her relationship with her mother is strained.  As she tries to uncover who is behind the murders, Camille begins to find skeletons from her own past. Dark things about her mother and family begin to come to the surface and it forces Camille to reconsider her own memories of those dark times growing up in her mother’s house.

While all of the books that I have read by Gillian Flynn often have dark subject matters, this one is probably the darkest and most disturbing for me.  The main character was mentally fragile and often makes terrible decisions, such as drinking and taking drugs with her thirteen year old sister.  Some of the things the main character thought and did made me cringe a bit.  However, while I was frustrated with Camille and her decisions, Flynn does a fantastic job of writing a character that is very well-developed.  Flynn is a fantastic writer and has an amazing ability to weave quite the web of deception and darkness in her novels.

My only complaint about this book was that I found it to be a bit more predictable than Flynn’s other books.  I had this book figured out about half way through it for the most part.  Seeing the details play out, however, was still engaging.  If you are okay with dark subject matter and mental illness, then pick this book up.  It’s fast-paced and interesting.  Overall, I rated this book three stars.

3 Star Rating

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission (at no cost to you).

2017 Reading List

Making Plans and Setting Goals

I am obsessed with setting goals.  Always have been.  So every year I make a New Year’s resolution to read a certain number of books.  I set my yearly reading goal in January and track it throughout the year.  I typically aim to read a book a week so I usually set my goal around fifty books per year.  My reading goal has been much lower the last couple of years thanks to grad school.  My graduate studies require me to read a great deal but I usually don’t count those books towards my yearly reading goal since I almost always don’t finish the required books or I skim a large portion of the book.

I graduate in May and I am so excited to be finished with required reading for college.  I am looking forward to being able to read the books that I want to read instead of what needs to be read for class.  As I do every year, I have set a yearly reading goal.  My goal for 2017 is to read fifty books.  That is roughly a book a week and I am already behind.  I have faith that I will easily catch up once I graduate in May.

I had intended to share this list in January but life got in the way. This list is in no way comprehensive.  I will undoubtedly pick up random books at bookstores and grab new releases throughout the year.  Also, many of the books on my list for this year are not recent releases.  While there are some current and new releases that I am looking forward to, grad school has kept me from reading the past two years so I plan to catch up on some older books this summer.

2017 Reading List

So, without further ado, the beginning of my 2017 reading list:

  1. The first book on my list is Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany and Jack Thorne.  I bought a hard copy of this book when it came out last summer and then the babies arrived.  It sat on my nightstand patiently waiting for me to pay attention to it.  I included it on this list since this is a list of books that I plan to read in 2017 but I actually ended up reading this book in January. (Review coming soon!!)
  2. I have jumped on The Fixer Upper bandwagon.  Chip and Joanna Gaines seem to be so genuine so their book The Magnolia Story is on my list. My husband bought this book for me for Christmas since he knew it was one that I wanted to read this year.  I started it right before my spring graduate classes started but I haven’t had time to finish it.  I’m hoping I will get to finish before the end of February.
  3. Wonder by R. J. Palacio is about a young boy who was born with a facial deformity and how that deformity affects his experience as the new kid at school.  This book is geared towards young readers.  My nine year old daughter recently read this and has been begging me to read it as well.  My daughter is quite a reader and she enjoys it when I read the same books as her.  I think she is starting to appreciate having someone who can discuss books with her.  I think this book may also work for some of my students who have lower reading levels.  I’m sticking it on my list to read this year so I can discuss it with Emily and make genuine recommendations to students who I think it could work for.
  4. The fourth book on my list is one that I’m not sure how I feel about.  A couple of years ago, the school I work for hosted a program for our students called Rachel’s Challenge based on one of the victims of the Columbine shooting.  The program was geared towards encouraging students to be kind to one another and help end bullying.  As I was sitting in this program, I realized that I really don’t know that much about the events that happened at Columbine.  I was only 12 when the shooting occurred and I’m sure the adults in my life sheltered me from that event.  However, now that I am an educator at a high school, I often feel consumed with the possibility of a school shooting.  On a weekly basis, I find myself running through my own personal plan of action and how I would react to help my students if something were to happen.  As a historian, I believe that some of the best preparation is studying what happened in the past.  I bought Columbine by Dave Cullen after that program was held at our high school and it has sat on my bookshelf for two years.  This year I am finally going to read it.  I’m hoping that, while it may be a difficult read, it may make me more aware of my students and my own kids.
  5. The Hour I First Believed by Wally Lamb is next on my list.  I intend to read this one shortly after I read Columbine.  The subject matters of the two books are related.  While Columbine is nonfiction, The Hour I First Believed is a fictional account of one of the school nurses at Columbine High School that fateful day.  I have heard good things about this book and about Wally Lamb as an author.  I have never read any of Lamb’s work so I am excited to check his writing out.
  6. My mom text me a few days ago and told me that I needed to read The Pecan Man by Cassie Dandridge Selleck.  I had honestly never heard of this book until I received that text but it was published in 2012 and has TONS of positive reviews on both Amazon and Goodreads.  The book summary compares this book to To Kill a Mockingbird and The Help, two books that I love so I’m hoping that I will love this one as well.  Sometimes, you just have to trust your momma!
  7. Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Yance is a memoir of the author’s experience growing up in a middle-class, white, working family that started out poor.  I have heard many people discussing how this book relates to America’s current political climate and provides insight to how the current president won the election.  I’ve heard and read rave reviews on this book so I’m looking forward to digging into this one.
  8.   Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone is about a junior high school suffering from mental disorders that she hides from those around her.  Samantha’s mental struggles are intensified by the social struggles that many high school girls often face until Caroline befriends her and introduces her to a group of misfits that help Sam to begin to feel more “normal.”  I think mental health is such an important topic in our culture right now.  I’m excited to read this book.  I have several students who have read or are reading this book and I think it resonates with so many of them.  I’m hoping that by reading it myself I will better be able to identify students who might need a book like this in their lives.
  9. The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney was published last year and I’ve heard quite a lot of chatter about this one.  This book is about four adult siblings who share an inheritance.  Even though all four are at different places in their lives and have different goals, they must work together to decide what to do with their shared inheritance.  This seems like an interesting story about a dysfunctional family which has been the premise of some of my favorite books.
  10. Veronica Roth, author of the Divergent trilogy, is at it again.  The first book of her newest series, Carve the Mark, was released in January.  I honestly haven’t heard much about this book but I really liked the Divergent series so I’m excited to see what else Veronica Roth has to offer.

 

What are some of the books that you are hoping to get your hands on this year?  What does your 2017 reading list look like?  Drop me a comment and give me some more ideas and suggestions to fill out the other forty books I need to read in order to reach my goal of 50 books in 2017!

Happy reading!

 

If I Stay

If I Stay
If I Stay

This book review was originally posted on The Wordy Nerd Books on August 10, 2014.

Mia is a seventeen year old musician with her whole life ahead of her.  She has just auditioned for a place at Juilliard.  Everything seems to be falling into place for Mia until one February morning when her entire family is killed in a tragic car accident.  Mia is the only survivor.  If I Stay by Gayle Forman follows Mia’s conscience as she makes the decision to either stay alive or pass on with the rest of her family.

I’m a bit late to this bandwagon but with the movie version coming out in mid-August I thought I should go ahead and read this one.  The premise of this story is that we have a choice.  Mia could have chosen to either live or die.  This decision is one that really forces the reader to think and to consider that choice.

Overall, the book is well written and the characters are very relate-able.  The ending to this book is a bit abrupt, however.  It leaves the reader wanting to find out more about the ending and what happens next.  Thankfully, Forman did write a sequel called Where She Went which I hope to read soon.

As I mentioned earlier, this book has been made into a movie and will be released on August 22.  You can find out more about the movie and watch the trailer here.

Overall, I liked this book and gave it four stars.  I think that young adult readers will enjoy this book and I plan to recommend it to my high school students this fall.

4 Star Rating